Home Phone Rates Tool | WhichVoIP.com

Home phone rates can vary significantly depending on which type of service you choose, and which service provider you decide upon. VoIP service is the most popular choice as it offers the lowest cost home phone rates while including every feature the average home user will need, and more. As long as your home has high speed Internet service, deciding to go with VoIP service is an easy choice. The more difficult decision is choosing which provider can offer you the best deal, along with reliable service. There are a few factors to consider:

This information is often hard to find on a providers website, so we have done the hard work for you, and created the following tool that breaks out home phone rates, contract lengths, minutes (advertised, international and reasonable usage), user reviews and equipment fees.

This tool is for home phone service only. If you are looking for provider pricing for your business take a look at our VoIP price tool for businesses.

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NOTE: If you are viewing this page on a mobile or handheld device some information may not be shown. View this page on a desktop or laptop device for the complete table.
Plan $/mo
Ratings Term Mins/mo Max
ATA Fees + Ship/Hand Details

*Cost per month over time takes into account special introductory pricing (which often expires after 1 year or 2 years). WhichVoIP does not guarantee the accuracy of the home phone cost above. Also EXCLUDES taxes and other fees. The rates are all per month.
**Providers Unlimited plans tend to have a reasonable usage limit for minutes as highlighted in this column.

Triple play service and home phone rates

A triple service is a service offered by the larger cable or phone companies and includes phone service, Internet service and TV service all in one bundle. The companies that offer this service make it extremely easy for new and existing customers to sign-up, and they also have great brand recognition thanks to the millions of dollars that are spent on advertising. The introductory rates for a triple play service can be very attractive, as bundling services helps the providers offer larger discounts. The problem is that when it comes to the home phone cost, triple play is typically still much higher than a stand-alone VoIP service. Additionally, the costs will likely go up after the promotional period has expired, and you could easily end up paying home phone rates above $20 per month. For this extra cost you will also most likely end up with a lot fewer features than a regular VoIP service that would cost you about half the price.

Terms and Conditions of service

Have you ever read through a terms and conditions document? We are betting the answer is no. When you have narrowed down your search for VoIP and are about to sign-up, it is prudent to take a couple of minutes and skim the terms and conditions of service, just to be sure there are no future surprises lurking. In particular check the cancelation section and the equipment section and if you still have any questions, please talk to the provider directly. This should ensure that you have a full picture of the overall home phone costs and what the cancellation fees will be, if any.

Please add a comment and let us know what you think of this tool or provide any additional insight into some of these plans.


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WhichVoIP Visitor Comments

#5 : Posted by Philippe on October 16th, 2015:

In a 2 story house, if my router is on the second level, how can I install a second telephone set on the main level?

-> Response: My recommendation, if possible, is to use a DECT phone set (cordless). Connect the base to the router and then distribute the cordless stations around the house. Alternatively use the telephone wiring BUT make sure you disconnect the landline at the NID before it comes into your house.


#4 : Posted by Evan Williams on January 4th, 2015:

Your comparisons are interesting.
I would like to use my landline phones (with speaker system) into the voip system. I have WiFi in my house. How could I hook up the landline phone to a voip system? Would I have to leave my computer on all the time, which I do not want to do?

-> Response: Hooking up the landline phone system is very straight-forward. The VoIP provider will send you a small ATA device (adapter) that essentially converts your landline analog phone into an IP based digital phone. Simply connect the ATA to your home network, usually with a provided Ethernet cable.
If you must use WiFi take a look at ATAs from Obihai or look at Ooma as they have WiFi adapters.
No PC is necessary for VoIP.


#3 : Posted by Nickie on April 6th, 2014:

I am so confused about how VoIP home phone services work. I cancelled my Comcast "Bundled Plan" some months ago. I signed up with Century Link for Internet service only. In October, 2013 I stupidly got an i Phone with Sprint. The service has been abominable. I am looking for a job, and cannot risk a cell phone which disconnects, and is garbled. So I thought researching the most affordable VoIP system was logical. I have multiple questions with each site I have researched. If I get a Magic Jack, or little box Basic Talk, can I set it up with my Century Link router, as I had when paying Comcast Bundled bill, but not have to pay Century Link for phone service? Is the Service really free and unlimited nationwide long distance, or do I have to pay a phone company too?

-> Response: Yes you should be able to get Internet through Century Link and then get a third party voip service for your phone needs. At that point you can cancel Century Link for phone service (but you must keep the Internet service). Regarding MagicJack you pay for the device and then a small fee each year for service. For Ooma you would pay a lot up front but never have another bill. Our Ooma versus MagicJack article may help. BasicTalk is quite expensive for what you get, I would also look at Phonepower as lots of features and low cost.


#2 : Posted by Leon Rouillier on April 6th, 2014:

You web site is extremely well done and useful to make a difficult decision since there are so many variable. With all the TV Ads you would think that Vonage is the best to use but after just a couple of days of comparing, it does not appear to be, though they have been in business for 8+ years. I found OOMA very professional with their website info. Thanks for the help

-> Response: Thanks for your kind feedback, we try to make the decision process a little easier. As you stated, there are a lot of variables at play. Vonage is a decent service but very expensive in our opinion. Ooma is indeed a good service, we recently wrote an editor review for Ooma which you may find useful. The only problem is it gets expensive if you want the full feature set.


#1 : Posted by Karen on June 25th, 2013:

Wow, had no idea Comcast was so much more expensive! Will look into some of these other providers, will save me over $20 each month. Thanks.


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